Historical Fiction talk at Grub Street’s Muse and the Marketplace 2014

May 1, 2014 § 2 Comments

Very excited to be heading down to Boston tomorrow morning for Grub Street’s annual Muse & The Marketplace conference. I don’t attend many writing conferences, but I’ve been lucky enough to have participated in this one for the last two years and it’s very, very good. Grub Street is somehow able to attract such a smart and friendly crowd of writers, agents, editors, and various others associated with this business of putting words on paper to enrich and enliven our world.

ageofinnocenceAlso exciting: this year will be my first as a presenter, or “Special Guest,” in the official parlance. I’ll be giving a talk called “Narrative as Time Machine: The Art of World-Building in Historical Fiction.” The talk will feature excerpts from some of my favorite works of historical fiction, including Edith Wharton’s classic The Age of Innocence, Mary Renault’s The King Must Die, James Welch’s Fool’s Crow, Charles Frazier’s Cold Mountain, and Michael Ondaatje’s The English Patient. Very much looking forward to it!

WPI_covercomp04While there, I’ll have a chance to run a couple of works-in-progress by a few agents and editors, and, perhaps most exciting of all, I’ll be bringing along (and giving away) several advance readers’ copies of my new novel, Will Poole’s Island, which has an official release date of August 15, 2014, and which, ahem, can now be pre-ordered on Amazon. Wish me luck!

Advertisements

Tagged: , , , , ,

§ 2 Responses to Historical Fiction talk at Grub Street’s Muse and the Marketplace 2014

  • Dwayne says:

    Will you be posting about your thoughts on Edith Wharton and world-building?

    Just finished Age of Innocence about a week ago – one of the finest novels I’ve ever read, and I don’t think there’s a bad sentence in the entire work.

    • timweed says:

      Thanks for your comment, Dwayne. I agree that Age of Innocence is the gold standard. I’m working on adapting my Grub Street lecture into a craft article in which Wharton’s work will figure prominently. I’ll post something here when/if that gets published. Happy writing!

Leave a reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

What’s this?

You are currently reading Historical Fiction talk at Grub Street’s Muse and the Marketplace 2014 at Tim Weed.

meta