Two new reviews for A Field Guide to Murder & Fly Fishing

January 17, 2019 § Leave a comment

AFieldGuideAudioCDcoverSo pleased to see that positive reviews for the collection continue to trickle in. The two most recent are from the Midwest Book Review and Trout Fisherman, a magazine based in Great Britain. Both reviews are excerpted below. You can read more excerpts and follow links to ALL known reviews here.

“This collection of stories by Tim Weed is grounded in the specificity of its settings, all of which contain hazards of one kind or another: a mountain lake, a jungle peak, an Amazonian river, a prairie giving way to construction, a seashore suddenly overcome by the tide, a city stuck in the past, a snowy slope (or two). But it is also full of mystery, and much of the mystery is cosmic . . . It is written so deftly, with such a light touch, that suspense builds in each story like a gathering storm.” — Patrick Joyce, Midwest Book Review

“Like other talented writers in this genre, Weed is not hampered by the brevity of the medium . . . His denouements are unpredictable and sometimes even merely hinted at, leaving the reader to fall back on his or her own imagination as to how the tale ends, which sounds frustrating but is actually quite a tantalizing device.” — Trout Fisherman (UK)

Order the paperback, ebook, or audiobook at your favorite independent bookstore or IndieBoundAmazonBarnes & Noble, or Audible. Limited first-edition hardcovers can still be ordered from these fine independent booksellers!

 

 

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The Boston Globe reviews A FIELD GUIDE TO MURDER & FLY FISHING

June 19, 2017 § Leave a comment

Very pleased about this one, obviously. In her review for The Boston Globe, Nina McLaughlin zeroes in on the collection’s sense of place: “ . . . each story deposits one definitively into a geography, of mind and map.” Read the full review here(It’s part of a literary round-up, so you have to scroll down a bit.) Read key excerpts from all reviews to date here.

9780997452877-JacketGrayAFG2.inddOrder at IndieBoundAmazon, or Barnes & Noble. A limited number of signed, first edition hardcovers are available from the fabulous Northshire Bookstore in Manchester, Vermont, or you can request it from your own favorite local bookstore! (ISBN# 978-0997452877)

If you’re in the Boston area, I’ll be reading and discussing the book in tandem with my GrubStreet colleague Crystal King (Feast of Sorrow) at Harvard Book Store in Cambridge, 7pm the evening of June 29. More info here.

 

A FIELD GUIDE TO MURDER & FLY FISHING reviewed by Center for Literary Publishing & Colorado Review

May 9, 2017 § Leave a comment

logoI’m profoundly honored by Mary Medlin’s in-depth and extremely thoughtful review of A Field Guide to Murder & Fly Fishing at the Center for Literary Publishing. CLP’s Colorado Review is one of the first and most prestigious literary journals to have published a story from the collection (“Six Feet Under the Prairie,” way back in 2004), so it’s a source that I find particularly meaningful. And I love the review! Here’s an excerpt:

“If you seek a guide—on coming of age, lost love, temptations both resisted and surrendered to, and the need to both engage with and respect the planet—Weed’s book is a good choice. It won’t tell you which laws to obey and which to break—but it will show you, with simultaneous beauty and savagery, what will happen either way.”

Read the entire review here.

New Reviews: A FIELD GUIDE TO MURDER & FLY FISHING

March 31, 2017 § Leave a comment

Two new reviews out. One from the distinguished Charles Butterfield writing in our great local newspaper the Brattleboro Reformer, and the other from the national Small Press Book Review. Very happy about both of these!

“Weed begins with the assumption that his readers are ready and able to see that the world is not as it seems. Things happen we cannot anticipate, and men change in surprising ways. Some of Weed’s stories verge on magical realism . . But most of these tales reside in the world of the senses. No ghosts, fantastical creatures or extra-planetary aliens move these stories. But visions, dreams and hallucinations do. Humans and their sometimes mysterious natures are all it takes for Weed to spin fiction of the first order.” Charles Butterfield, Brattleboro Reformer (full review here.)

“As readers, we have been given passports into Tim Weed’s fictional worlds . . . We cannot alter the fates of those we have joined but, if we give them a chance, they could alter ours.” Small Press Book Review (full review here)

This page has updated links to all reviews of A FIELD GUIDE TO MURDER & FLY FISHING.

Eight Novels to Prepare You for the End of Civilization at Talking Writing

March 21, 2017 § Leave a comment

9622480490_57c0de302d_zYet another new article up, this one at Talking Writing. Here’s a quick excerpt:

Novels act like beacons in stormy weather. Even when they promise an escape from the daily onslaught, novels light a path forward in ways nonfiction can’t. They allow readers to live out life’s worst-case scenarios from within the safety of their own imaginations so that when something terrible actually happens—a personal tragedy, a natural catastrophe, a deadly plague—it’s not a complete surprise. As a reader, I’m an easy mark for dystopian and post-apocalyptic fiction, and I’m often struck by the unique way such novels deliver not only practical strategies for surviving the unthinkable but emotional strategies, too—which ultimately may be more important. It’s hard to overstate the solace good fiction can provide even in the darkest of times.

So, if you’re stocking the shelves of your survival shelter, don’t forget to throw in a few gripping novels. Here are eight that strike me as especially pertinent right now.

Read the full article here!

The Historical Novel Society reviews Will Poole’s Island

February 11, 2015 § Leave a comment

hnsThe Historical Novel Society is an organization I respect, so I am quite honored that they have deemed Will Poole’s Island important enough to featureTheir reviewer made some interesting points about the book, and I think that in the final analysis he “got” it. What more can a first-time novelist ask?

Here’s the quote the reviewer references regarding my approach to mythic thinking within the novel:

“Unless we can find some way to understand the reality of mythic thinking we remain prisoners of our own language, our own thoughtworld. In our world one story is real, the other, fantasy. In the Indian way of thinking both stories are true because they describe personal experience . . . Historical events happened once and are gone forever. Mythic events return like the swans of spring . . . They are essential truths, not contingent ones.” – Robin Ridington

Read the full review here.

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